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Trail’s End – The Gable House

Trail’s End – The Gable House

Durango’s Victorian Diamond By Linda Wommack James Schutt was a wealthy businessman by the time he built his grand home in 1892. When the town of Durango was established, Schutt established one of the first of the three mercantile stores, as well as a flour mill. The Victorian mansion, located at 805 5th Ave., was […]

Trail’s End – 150 Years Ago: The Indian Raids of Julesburg

Trail’s End – 150 Years Ago: The Indian Raids of Julesburg

  In 1859, Jules Beni, a French trader, established Julesburg as a trading post along the South Platte River in the northeastern corner of Colorado. From the beginning, this was an important stop along the Overland Trail, although the trail only crossed this small section of what would become Colorado. Yet the north/south fork of […]

Trail’s End – Cowboy Hats and Stetson − Get your cowboy on

Trail’s End – Cowboy Hats and Stetson − Get your cowboy on

The National Western Stock Show, the granddaddy and Super Bowl of stock events, proves that Denver is indeed still a cow town, at least once a year. The two-week stretch is a fun time to dress western and dust off your cowboy hats. But, let’s remember that cowboy hats are not just for looking like […]

How Saint Nick became Santa Claus

How Saint Nick became Santa Claus

By Rosemary Fetter The story of our beloved Santa Claus, the chubby little guy in the red, fur-trimmed suit, dates back to the fourth century, when legends arose around a Turkish bishop, later known as St. Nicholas. Born March 15, 270 A.D., in the Greek village of Patara (now in southern Turkey), Nicholas was still […]

150 Years Ago: Black Kettle & The Sand Creek Massacre

150 Years Ago: Black Kettle & The Sand Creek Massacre

As Black Kettle rode in solitude across the wind-blown prairie of eastern Colorado, his expression revealed the concern and worry of the elder Indian chief.  In the crisp autumn air of 1864, Black Kettle reflected on the bloody summer that had witnessed terror and murder across the plains. Roving bands of young Cheyenne and Arapaho […]

Trail’s End – Let’s talk turkeys and the poultry farms of Lakewood

Trail’s End – Let’s talk turkeys and the poultry farms of Lakewood

Today a burgeoning suburb, Lakewood sprouted from agricultural origins and for several decades reigned as a leading poultry producer. A few people still remember the day when the rural area was covered with vegetable gardens, fruit orchards, hayfields and dairy operations. Lakewood’s poultry farming became possibly the city’s longest lasting agricultural enterprise. One of the […]

Trail’s End – Lawmen and the Lawless

Trail’s End – Lawmen and the Lawless

In the closing years of the 19th century, Colorado faced economic doom and gloom. It all changed when a new gold rush revived the state in a little known area on the south side of Pikes Peak. In October 1890, a roaming cowpoke, Bob Womack, discovered an abundance of gold float in the low-flowing waters […]

Trail’s End – John Brisben Walker pioneered Denver’s entertainment industry

Trail’s End – John Brisben Walker pioneered Denver’s entertainment industry

By Rosemary Fetter A creative visionary who swept in and out of local history for more than half a century, John Brisben Walker, Sr. did more for Denver than many others whose names are etched on city streets, parks and buildings. Although some of his projects failed or developed into more grandiose schemes for which […]

Trial’s End – Colorado Colors

Trial’s End – Colorado Colors

Guanella Pass Scenic Byway As a Colorado native, I have taken many mountain drives during the aspen season since I was a child. All are beautiful, all over the state.  However, an often-overlooked scenic drive is just an hour from Denver, and perhaps one of the most colorful. The Guanella Pass Scenic Byway can be […]

Trail’s End – Inclines and Funicular Railways in Colorado

Trail’s End – Inclines and Funicular Railways in Colorado

One way to get up the mountain In the first few years of the 1900s, small tourist railways sprouted up on Colorado’s Front Range, creeping up steep slopes to carry tourists to spectacular summit views. Five funiculars and incline railways operated in the foothills west of Denver, at the foot of Pikes Peak and in […]

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